Wednesday, September 26, 2012






Into The Abyss


This is not the Republican Party of Ronald Reagan.  Heck, this isn't the party even of John McCain.   It was a mere four years ago that a woman at the latter's campaign rally said of Barack Obama (famous video below) "he's an Arab."    McCain responded "no, ma'am, no ma'am.  He's a decent family man, citizen, that I just happen to have differences with on fundamental isues.  And that's what this campaign is all about."

In May of this year, at a town hall event in Euclid, Ohio outside of Cleveland (as is everywhere in the world, except Cleveland), a woman stood and stated "We have a president right now who is operating outside the structure of our Constitution, and I do agree he should be tried for treason."   The candidate's response:  "As I'm sure you do, I happen to believe that the Constitution was not just brilliant, but probably inspired.  I believe the same thing about the Declaration of Independence."

Asked afterward by reporters if he agreed with the lady, Romney responded “No, of course not.” Queried by CNN, he replied “I don’t correct all of the questions that get asked of me. Obviously, I don’t agree that he should be tried.”

Glad we got that cleared up.   The fellow who would go on to become the GOP nominee for President believes the incumbent should not be tried for aiding and abetting the enemy.   Bold of him to say so.

Still, Romney's sense of decency exceeds that of one of his party's sitting United States Senators, Scott Brown of Massachusetts.   During one of the Senator's rallies earlier this week, supporters chanted (video way below) what are described as "Indian war whoops" and Tomahawk chops to ridicule challenger Elizabeth Warren's contention that she is 1/32 American Indian or Alaska Native/ Native American/ Indigenous Person.

But these were no ordinary supporters.   The group included a Republican operative as well as Brown's Deputy Chief of Staff, Constituent Service Counsel, Special Assistant, and the State Director of his Boston office.  Caught with his pants figuratively down, the junior Senator from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts remarked "It is certainly something that I don't condone.   The real offense is that (Warren) said she was white and then checked the box saying she is Native American, and then she changed her profile in the law directory once she made her tenure."

So the Senator says that he doesn't condone what he then went on to say is in response to a grievous act by his opponent.

Try it yourself.   Have someone accuse you of two inappropriate acts- one which you regret and one which you don't, but both of which you know the other individual knows is wrong.    In the first instance, you will reply "I am sorry for..." or "I regret that..." or "I don't condone."  In the second instance, your impulse will be to add the word "certainly," as if to say "Yes, I got it, you don't like it."

If Brown didn't condone it, one or more of his staffers would be fired for the display of ethnic bigotry Scott Brown obviously condones.   Instead, attempting to justify the behavior, he shifts the issue to his opponent.   "I don't condone it," Brown says, "but Warren deserved it."

The true measure of the depths to which the Gas and Oil Party has sunk is not the feeble, somewhat cowardly response of a Mitt Romney, who has inadvertently conceded he is not qualified to be President.   It is, rather, the acceptance- nay, support- for prejudice publicly offered by a sitting Senator desperate to be re-elected.















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