Thursday, January 25, 2024

Biden, Absolutely




If there were a category for "white privilege from black guy," this tweeter would win hands-down.  

 It's easy to be easy to be in favor of anything when there is no downside to support of a organization, cause, or movement. Not so with Joe Biden being the most pro-labor President since Lyndon Johnson or possibly beyond.  In October, Peter Nicholas and Peter Alexander of NBC News wrote 

Joe Biden’s tight alliance with organized labor has unnerved some of his business supporters, who worry that his rhetoric and administration's actions make it tough to rally corporate leaders and CEOs and win their energetic backing of his 2024 presidential candidacy.

Advisers have directly urged Biden to state bluntly that he wants to help business succeed — a message that tends to get lost as he courts working-class voters and embraces their cause for better pay and working conditions, said a top political ally who requested anonymity to speak frankly about internal discussions.

 “You deserve what you’ve earned, and you’ve earned a hell of a lot more than you’re getting paid now," Biden said last month during a first-of-its-kind appearance with striking workers at a picket line in Michigan. Talking through a bullhorn, he stood alongside United Auto Workers President Shawn Fain who, when it was his turn to speak, said that CEOs "sit in their offices, they sit in meetings, and they make decisions. But we make the product."

The video to which the tweet links is a portion of the message delivered by United Auto Workers President Shawn Fain on January 22 at the union's annual National Community Action Program Conference.. Fain referred briefly to the war in the Mideast but

also criticized the wealthy for using issues like gender identity, sexual orientation, race, and nationality to divide the working class, and it was in this context that he criticized the scapegoating of immigrants. He also emphasized the UAW's history of backing civil rights and environmental justice.

That highlights a stark divide between Democrats and Republicans, which can be missed only by an individual with a serious sense of privilege. Biden is not only pro-labor but with a perspective radically different than that of his immediate predecessor. And so 

The criticism Biden faces may be driven in part by the pendular shift since the Trump administration, when business flourished under tax cuts and deregulatory measures. Most of the tax cuts that Donald Trump signed into law in 2017 wound up benefiting corporations and higher-income individuals, a Congressional Research Service report showed.

Today, business leaders point to a Biden appointee, Federal Trade Commission Chairwoman Lina Khan, along with heads of agencies that oversee labor and consumer relations as impediments to competition and survival in the marketplace.

“Biden at his core is a blue-collar guy from Scranton. He’s never worked in business and he doesn’t have any particular interest in those issues and I don’t criticize him for that,” said Steven Rattner, a longtime Democratic donor who headed the auto industry task force in the Obama administration. “Rightly or wrongly, there’s a perception that there’s a fair amount of hostility toward business, and that makes the business community nervous.”

One Democratic fundraiser, who like others spoke on the condition of anonymity to talk freely, said: “As a general matter, the business community has felt very much ignored by Biden. In our part of the business community, where we raise money, Lina Khan’s name — both of them — are four-letter words." Khan has rankled business by targeting large companies, such as Amazon and Microsoft, and stoking uncertainty about future mergers.

Upon announcing his union's endorsement, Fain asserted "instead of talking trash about our union, Joe Biden stood with us. Donald Trump stands against everything we stand for as a union, as a society."  Radical or not, it is an inescapable observation.


  

 


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