Monday, July 25, 2016

Friends In Low Places





Donald Trump has some well-placed friends. One is the Russian government and the other is, as he would put it, radical Islamic terrorists. As President Obama stated on Face the Nation

If we start engaging in the kinds of proposals that we've heard from Mr. Trump or some of his surrogates like Mr. [Newt] Gingrich, where we start suggesting that we would apply religious tests to who could come in here, that we are screening Muslim Americans differently than we would others, then we are betraying that very thing that makes America exceptional.

The President maintained that Trump's rhetoric is "ultimately helping do ISIL's work. In January CNN had reported

An al Qaeda affiliate has apparently released a new recruitment video, telling Muslims in America that the country has a long history of racism and discrimination and will turn on its Muslim community.

The video purportedly by Somali terrorist group al-Shabaab uses historic civil rights era footage of firebrand Malcolm X and audio of 2016 presidential candidate Donald Trump to label the United States a racist society.








It happened again fewer than three months later when ISIL released a recruitement video which

celebrates the attacks in Belgium and features Donald Trump. As images of flames dance over the Republican presidential front-runner's face and footage rolls of emergency workers in Brussels, audio from a recent Trump interview with Fox News plays. "Brussels was one of the great cities. One of the most beautiful cities of the world 20 years ago," Trump says. "It was amazing actually. And safe. And now it's a horror show. It's an absolute horror show."

The nine-minute video, allegedly released by the Al-Battar Media Foundation, a pro-ISIS media group, flashes phrases such as "Brothers, rise up!" and "Let's go, let's go, let's go for jihad" as Trump and pundits are heard describing the Brussels attacks. The video also includes shots of fighters brandishing AK-47s and other weapons and extols the virtues of those who are willing to attack the terrorist group's enemies. A narrator intones, "The Crusade jets—including the Belgian—are still bombing the Muslims in Iraq and Levant day and night, killing children, women, old, and destroying mosques and schools."

The user who uploaded the video to YouTube was banned within minutes of posting, according to Politico, because of the site's policy of taking down pro-ISIS recruitment videos.

When Trump was asked about the earlier video, he responded, reasonably, "Look, there's a problem. I bring it up... They use other people. What am I going to do? I have to say what I have to say."

A man has to do what a man has to do. For Donald Trump, it's encouraging Vladimir Putin and those radical Islamist terrorists he blames on Hillary Clinton and whose attacks he skillfully uses to gin up terror in the public.   In the unlikely event Trump's recent surge in popularity is maintained and he ends up in the White House, he'll have at least two powerful allies to thank.









Share |

No comments:

Now Or Never

Put up or shut up. That was Donald Trump's message to NFL players on September 22, 2017 when he responded to prayers who kne...